Storm ready!

Emergency Management & Safety Services team keep UNT prepared with storm-readiness tips

UNT's Emergency Management & Safety Services team keep track of weather alerts

Spring has almost sprung, which means severe weather is coming… probably. Each year, North Texas faces a significant severe weather threat particularly during the spring months. But, severe weather can occur at any time of the year.  In January, North Texas saw five tornadoes.

Did you know that UNT has an Emergency Operations Center with staff who are monitoring the weather conditions on campus – both Denton and Frisco – 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year? Yes, even when the university is closed, there are UNT staff members closely monitoring the weather.

The most important thing a person can do is take responsibility for his or her own safety. As we enter into those spring months of heightened weather risk, Emergency Management & Safety Services is here to share the most important things you need to do to be mean green ready for severe weather!

Update your Eagle Alert information

Eagle Alert is the primary means by which UNT community members receive emergency notifications (e.g., Tornado Warning). Visit my.unt.edu (students and faculty) or my.untsystem.edu (staff) to update your contact information! Also follow @UNTEagleAlert on Twitter to get up-to-date information as an emergency situation unfolds.

Be #WeatherAware at all times

Being #WeatherAware means always understanding what the weather is like outside and how that weather can impact you. When severe weather is in the forecast, keep an eye on the weather. The National Weather Service is a reliable resource for rapidly changing weather conditions. Follow UNT Emergency Management and Safety Services on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram for ongoing updates as well.

Know where to go

Identify your nearest shelter areas. Shelter areas are designated for every building on campus and can be viewed at UNT Emergency Floor Plans or via the UNT Mean Green Ready App.

Know the difference between a watch and a warning

A watch means that conditions are favorable for a particular type of weather. A warning, however, means that the weather event is underway. Here are some of the most common weather terms you may encounter here on campus:

  • Severe thunderstorm watch—Severe thunderstorms are possible. Remain alert for approaching storms, watch the sky and stay tuned to NOAA Weather Radios, commercial radio or the local news for more information.
  • Severe thunderstorm warning—A severe thunderstorm has been sighted or indicated by weather radar and people in the area should take shelter immediately.
  • Tornado watch—Tornadoes are possible. Be alert for approaching storms, watch the sky and stay tuned to NOAA Weather Radios, commercial radio or the local news for more information.
  • Tornado warning—A tornado has been sighted or indicated by weather radar and people in the area should take shelter immediately.

Learn what to do and what resources are available to help you prepare for severe weather

Visit UNT Emergency Management and NWS Weather Safety for more about severe weather and the tools available to help with preparedness efforts. Visit KnoWhat2Do to make an emergency plan for yourself and your family.

In addition to monitoring the weather, Emergency Management & Safety Services provides emergency preparedness training, monitors during on-campus special events, helps departments and offices on campus plan for emergencies, inspects campus buildings to ensure compliance with laws and regulations, facilitates the international travel registration program, among so much more.

Follow UNT Emergency Management on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram for the most up-to-date safety information and weather information for UNT Denton, Discovery Park, and the New College at Frisco.